General

Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome Video Release

Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a rare genetic syndrome affecting approximately 1 in 100,000 individuals. People with RTS typically have in intellectual disability and may show particular behaviours more often than people who have intellectual disability but do not have a diagnosis of RTS. It also appears that individuals with RTS may some a specific profile of cognitive strengths and weaknesses, which may impact on how individuals with RTS process information about the world around them. Over the last 10 years, the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders has been working with the RTS Syndrome Support Group in the UK to conduct research into difficulties that some individuals with RTS experience. The areas that the Cerebra Centre have researched have focused on repetitive behaviour, problem solving and how the brain processes information, social behaviour and the ways in which people with RTS think about social situations.

The Cerebra Centre have produced three videos that introduce the research that the Cerebra Centre has conducted with people RTS. The first video introduces some of the children with RTS and the key research findings, and the second and third video give some brief recommendations for supporting people with RTS. There are also four documents that can be downloaded below that summarise this information.

 

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Special Report: Behaviour and the Brain in Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome

Research Summary: Social Behaviour in Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome

Social Vulnerability in RTS: Hints and Tips

Repetitive Behaviours in RTS: Hints and Tips

 

More papers on Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome:

Diverse Profiles of Anxiety Related Disorders in Fragile X, Cornelia de Lange and Rubinstein–Taybi Syndromes. [View on Researchgate] [Alternative View]

A comparative study of sociability and selective mutism in autism spectrum disorder, Angelman, Cri du Chat, Cornelia de Lange, Fragile X and Rubinstein-Taybi syndromes. [View on Researchgate] [Alternative View]

Dissociation of Cross-Sectional Trajectories for Verbal and Visuo-Spatial Working Memory Development in Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome. [View on Researchgate] [Alternative View]

Repetitive Behavior in Rubinstein–Taybi Syndrome: Parallels with Autism Spectrum Phenomenology. [View on Researchgate] [Alternative View]

A comparative study of sociability in autism spectrum disorder, Angelman, Cornelia de Lange, Fragile X, Down and Rubinstein-Taybi syndromes. [View on Researchgate] [Alternative View]

Face scanning and spontaneous emotion preference in Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. [View on Researchgate] [Alternative View]

Effect of adult familiarity on social anxiety and motivation in Fragile X, Rubinstein-Taybi and Cornelia de Lange syndromes. [View on Researchgate]

The effect of familiarity and nature of interaction on social anxiety and motivation in fragile X, Cornelia de Lange and Rubinstein-Taybi syndromes. [View on Researchgate]

Eye tracking to explore spontaneous emotion discrimination and face processing in autism spectrum disorder, fragile X, Cornelia de Lange, and Rubinstein-Taybi syndromes. [View on Researchgate]



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